Director of YOUTH Ministry & Assessment report

St. Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral  Director of Youth Ministry – Full-Time
 
The Director of Youth Ministry oversees the youth ministry by casting and living out a vision for the ministry; developing meaningful relationships with youth and their parents through faithful and Christ centered ministries, programs, and activities; and recruiting and equipping faithful adults to be active participants in the life and vision of youth ministry.  
 
DESCRIPTION AND RESPONSIBILITIES:  
 
VISIONING: The Director of Youth Ministry works with a team of parents and other committed adults to develop and evaluate the short term  (1 year) and the long term (3-5 years) vision for the youth ministry at St. Mark’s that includes faith development and growth through: fellowship, mission, Bible study, relationships, and church involvement.  
 
RELATIONSHIPS:  Director of Youth Ministry ensures that relationships are being built between the youth, the youth ministry staff, volunteers and the church as a whole. These relationships show guidance, support, and encouragement in faith development and in all other aspects of their lives. Equally, the Director of Youth Ministry should seek to build relationships with the parents of the youth who support and encourage them as they seek to raise faithful teenagers.  
 
RECRUITING: The Director of Youth Ministry works with a team to recruit and train volunteers who support all the different aspects of the youth ministry.   
 
PROGRAMS:  The Director of Youth Ministry, in collaboration with a team of people, oversees all programs and special events related to the youth ministry. 
 
Time Commitment: 40 hours per week or would consider a part time position with a calling to serve youth. 
 
Special Talents & Skills Preferred:  ● A growing and personable relationship with Christ ● A bachelor's degree preferred with 0-2 years’ experience ● A great understanding of today’s adolescents ● An ability and desire to connect with parents ● Excellent communication skills through all mediums (oral, written, digital, etc.) ● Organized ● Creative ● Develop and maintain a budget ● A desire to constantly learn and grow 
 
 
Please send cover letter and resume to Father Thomas Nsubuga at thomas@stmarkscathedral.net  or fax to 318 424 8427.


YOUTH MINISTRY ASSESSMENT REPORT
Building Sustainable Ministries . . . One Church at a Time
www.ministryarchitects.com
Saint Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral of Shreveport, LA
June 22, 2016
By Chris Sasser, Lead Consultant and Brian Kuhn, Staff Consultant
chris.sasser@ministryarchitects.com brian.kuhn@ministryarchitects.com

BACKGROUND
St. Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral describes itself as a community where “families and
individuals encounter the Word of God, pray together, and discern the movement of the
Holy Spirit in our lives”. The Cathedral has a membership of 1300 and averages 380 on
Sundays in one of four worship services, and offers many opportunities for families and
individuals to be involved throughout the week. The Very Rev. Alston B. Johnson is the
current Dean of St. Mark’s. He is the third Dean to be called to the Cathedral and has
been with St. Mark’s since November of 2012. St. Mark’s offers five weekend services:
Holy Eucharist Fridays at 5:30, Holy Eucharist Rite One Sundays at 8:00 a.m., Holy
Eucharist Rite Two Sundays at 10:30 a.m. and 6:00 p.m., and Evensong Sundays at
5:15 p.m. They also offer a Wednesday morning Holy Eucharist Rite One service at 7:00
a.m.
Currently there are between 70-100 students grades 6-12 on the rolls at St. Mark’s.
During a typical week, 25-30 students are active in church activities with the largest
number participating in youth group events that happen on Wednesday nights. The
program sponsors one big trip a year that attracts even more youth participation.
Confirmation has operated in a variety of different ways of the past number of years
including as a part of the curriculum at St. Mark’s School. The youth ministry programs
are supported by 15-20 volunteers who minister to the youth in many different ways; with
an average of three volunteers helping weekly. Currently the youth are without
permanent space in the building because of having to share space during the school
renovation.

A large ministry of the church is the Pre-K-8th grade school which is on the campus of
the church. The school’s goal is to “develop a student who feels self-confident
educationally, socially, and spiritually and who can reach out to help other in our
community.” In 2015-16 the school’s enrolled 350 students, 20-25% of which are
children and youth of St. Mark’s Cathedral.
The church has a budget for 2016 of $2,000,000. A total of $138,000 is budgeted for
youth, which includes salary and benefits for a full time Lay Canon of Family Ministries, a
part time Associate Youth Minister, and funds for the program and activities. The
ministry is led by Brooks Boylan who has been at the church since 2010. Brooks will be
leaving in July to pursue ordination.
Ministry Architects was invited by Dean Johnson to do an initial assessment of the youth
ministry and to make recommendations about how it might move strategically forward
with the hope that we can help guide St. Marks to a greater and more impactful youth
ministry as well as assist in the transition to new youth ministry staff. Ministry Architects
met with 68 individuals in nine focus groups or one-on-one meetings. What follows are
the findings gleaned from those conversations along with recommendations and a
proposed timeline for the future.

YOUTH MINISTRY IN CONTEXT
One lens Ministry Architects likes to use for understanding youth ministry is the idea of
the “three rents.” Youth ministries that “pay these rents” tend to have much greater
freedom to be creative, take risks, and experiment with innovative ideas. Those youth
ministries that fail to pay these rents often find themselves mired in distrust, second guessing,
and discouragement.
It has been Ministry Architects’ experience that though these three rents, in and of
themselves, do not ensure an effective or faithful ministry, they are often the most
immediate evaluation tools used by youth, parents, staff, and the congregation at large.

Rent #1: NUMBERS—A significant percentage of youth need to be participating visibly
in some aspect of the church’s ministry. It is important for this target number to be clearly
agreed on by the church leaders and the staff. Ironically, when target numbers are not
established, the youth ministry is typically more likely to be judged by numbers than if
the target numbers are clearly established.
The consensus is that this rent is not being paid due to the small number of youth
participating in the programs of the church consistently.

Rent #2: PROGRAMS—In order to “earn the right” to experiment with changes, the
youth leadership needs to provide the church with a few visible, effective youth programs
that give both youth and parents “something to talk about.”
This rent is being paid in part, but the balance is due. Wednesday night Bible studies,
“Biscuits and Bible” and “Coffice” are programs that are known and talked about but the
lack of effective, consistent EYC events creates angst among many.
Rent #3: ENTHUSIASM—The joyful enthusiasm and positive attitude of the youth staff,
volunteers, and the youth themselves are essential to building trust with the leadership
of the church and with the parents.
Comments suggest that this rent is also being paid in part. Although there are issues
and concerns, most we spoke with had a real love for the church and youth staff and an
enthusiasm about where the ministry could go in the future.
As the leadership of the youth ministry develops its long-range vision, it will need, at the
same time, to be attentive to these “three rents.” In this sense, the youth ministry faces
parallel challenges.
Ministry Architects pictures the parallel challenge this way:
As the youth ministry leadership steps into this parallel process, five rules of thumb –
“youth ministry norms” – will be helpful to keep in mind. These are not necessarily
targets for success; they are simply what an average church typically experiences:
1) 10% of the Worshiping Congregation—In a typical church, the size of the youth
ministry tends to settle at a number that is around 10% of the worshiping
congregation. A church with an average worship attendance of 380 could expect an
average weekly attendance of around 38 youth per week at events. The current
weekly attendance of 25 youth is below what could be expected from the ministry.
1. Laying the Foundation: Building a
foundation and infrastructure that
will ensure the youth ministry’s
future effectiveness, and at the
same time,
2. Continuing to Do Ministry:
Maintaining the current youth
ministry in a way that builds the
enthusiasm of youth, their
families, the staff and the church
at large.

2) 20% Ceiling—Ministry Architects has also discovered that in many churches, the
youth ministry has difficulty growing beyond a level that equals 20% of the weekly
worshiping congregation.
Very few youth ministries seem to be able to break beyond this 20% level. St. Mark’s
might keep in mind, then, that the expected ceiling for this youth ministry is around
76 youth. The road to that level of participation is dependent on increased staffing
and volunteers.
3) $1,000 per Youth—With a budget of approximately $138,000 (including program
budget, staff salaries, and benefits) dedicated to the youth ministry, St. Mark’s has
the capacity to effectively reach and maintain a weekly participation level of
somewhere in the neighborhood of 138 youth in some aspect of the church’s life.
With 25 currently participating every week, the ministry is well-funded for continued
growth.
4) 1 Full-Time Staff Person for Every 50 Youth—Considering all the positions
giving time to the youth ministry, St. Mark’s has the equivalent of 1.75 full time staff
persons. According to this rule of thumb, the church has the capacity to sustain the
engagement of about 87 youth on a weekly basis. The current staff configuration
allows room for significant numerical growth.
5) 1 Adult for Every 5 Youth— Ministry Architects likes to think in terms of “spans of
care,” recognizing that, realistically, most volunteers cannot effectively oversee the
church’s Christian nurture of more than about five youth on an ongoing basis. With
an average of 3 weekly volunteers, St. Mark’s is currently at a ratio of 1 adult leader
to every 8 youth. The current team seems to be a bit undersized for a ministry of 25
youth. If the church wants to expand it’s impact, it will need to consider recruiting
more volunteers.
BUILDING A SUSTAINABLE STAFF
When a ministry is based solely on the giftedness of a single staff person, instability is a
predictable result. Ministry Architects has found that the most stable approach to staffing
a ministry, particularly in the early stages of a rebuild, is to build a team of three different
kinds of people:
• The Architect: A person or organization that designs the building plan and
ensures that building is done in compliance with the agreed-upon plan.
• The General Contractor: A person or team who manages the flow and
sequencing of work, manages the building process according to the agreed-upon
blueprint, and ensures that the appropriate number of “laborers” is in place for
each stage of the project.
• The Laborers: Those people charged with specific gifts and responsibilities for
particular aspects of the work. In youth ministry, a laborer might have particular
skills in relating to youth, in planning and managing events, or in teaching.
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Each of these roles is important as St. Mark’s pursues a more sustainable model of
youth ministry. As the church moves forward, the following observations will be helpful to
keep in mind:
• In many churches, there is no person or group playing the role of the architect.
The ministry simply moves from one event to the next without a clear vision or
stated outcomes.
• Sometimes paid staff are not given the time or training to do their important work
as the “general contractor” of a complex ministry.
• The staff is often expected to serve in all three of these roles. This is a recipe for
congregational dissatisfaction and staff burnout.
• Some churches hire a laborer who is skilled at leading singing, playing games or
teaching a Bible lesson. These laborers often mature into an architect or a
general contractor, but only if they are given permission, time, and training.
ASSETS
Strengths to protect in the current youth ministry
A Desire for Change
St. Mark’s is ready for something more from the youth program. There is a great sense
and appreciation for the growth in the youth program over the past number of years and
family, staff, and volunteers are ready for the program to continue to grow and reach
new levels of success. As one parent stated, “We desire to have something more for our
children.”
St. Mark’s School
The school is a great ministry of the church that offers opportunities to reach out to
middle school youth in a unique and faithful way. The school exposes the church to
youth (and youth to the church) who would not otherwise have any connection with the
church. The school also offers the potential for unique faith development in partnership
with the church.
Core Group of Youth Who Want the Program to Grow
There is a core group of youth who believe deeply in the youth programs at St. Mark’s
and want them to grow in numbers and in substance. The youth are excited about what
their church is offering them and the potential for more in the near future. They want to
share the programs with their friends, and they want the programs to be as accessible
and attractive to as many of their peers as possible. One youth said, “We just want
people to show up and be committed.” Another said, “I like that it makes me feel like I
am a part of something.”
Resources at Their Fingertips
St. Mark’s is rich with faithful gifts and resources. There is a talent pool of parents and
other invested adults that can help build, lead, and sustain a faithful youth program for
years to come. There is also a large group of people who are willing to support the
programs behind the scenes, financially, and prayerfully.
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
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Desire to Be Mission Focused
Mission projects, mission trips, and a need to look outside themselves is a driving force
in the call for growth in the youth programs. The youth are ready to put into action the
faith they are developing together and the adults are excited to help make that happen.
As a parent stated, “I want my kids to have service trips and interaction with other
people.” There is also an understanding that mission work is one of the ways that the
programs begin appeal to a wider range of youth and their families. One youth said, “A
mission trip would be very cool.”
Potential for Involvement
There is a large group of youth whose families are members of St. Mark’s but who are
not engaged in the youth programs at all or only on the periphery. These are youth who
are acolytes, choir members, and regular worship attenders. This is a group of youth that
the youth programs don’t have to reach too far to connect with and whose families are
looking for something faithful and meaningful for their children to be connected with.
Biscuits, Bible Study & “Coffice”
“Coffice” on Monday, “Biscuits and Bible” on Wednesday morning and EYC Bible Study
on Wednesday nights are great programs to build off of. They are popular, relational,
and faith developing. Brooks has developed two programs that are not only meeting the
needs of the youth of St. Mark’s but are also foundational for growth and depth.
Lack of Sacred Cows
There seem to be no events, programs, or structures of the youth ministry that hold it
back from growth and change. Sacred cows can be a hindrance in moving forward,
trying something new, or retiring ineffective ministry moments. St. Mark’s and EYC have
been able to avoid being stuck with scared cows and the fear and anxiety that come with
them.
Church as a Home
It is clear that the families and member’s of St. Mark’s see their church as a home.
People who grew up in the church come back to the church, there are generations of
families who have seen the church struggle and succeed over many years, and they all
have a commitment and belief in what God is doing throughout the ministries. This is a
feeling and reality that young people are looking for and want to be a part of. It is clear
that being a “home” is written in the DNA of the Cathedral.
CHALLENGES
Obstacles to moving the youth ministry strategically forward
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
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CONSTRUCT bridges to the best ministry resources available today
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Lack of Depth/ Perceived Lack of Depth
Despite the great relational programming offered to the youth at St. Mark’s there is a
lack, or at least a perceived lack, of depth within the programs. Parents and youth alike
spoke to the desire for the programs to offer a deeper connection in faith development,
application to life, and mission opportunities. As one parent put it, “They (youth) want
substance.” There is a strong belief that these missing elements would help attract more
youth, illicit greater support from parents, and lay the foundations for a lasting and
meaningful faith. As one participant articulated, “(The youth) might be more willing to
skip practice from time to time if they felt like they were going to get something out of it.”
Parent Involvement
Many parents voiced the concern that they did not feel a connection to the youth
program. There is a lack of understanding in what happens and what their children are
getting out of it. They expressed a lack of communication of details and expectations,
last minute requests for help, and frustration over attempts to voice concerns and feeling
disregarded as reasons for the separation. There also seems to be a question about
how much parents want to be involved in the youth programs. When asked the amount
of commitment would be fair to ask of them, the answers varied from “once every two
weeks” to “once a quarter.” One parent cited the desire for adolescents to have “other
adults in their life.”
St. Mark’s School
The challenge with St. Mark’s School is twofold:
• There is a feeling among some families that the youth programs cater to the
middle school youth who attend the school. One parent said, “Sometimes it feels
like my kids are not welcome at youth events because they are tailored for the
kids who go to school here.” Another parent said, “It should not feel like an
either/or when it comes to youth events and whether or not the kid attends the
school.”
• There is also a feeling among families that being at the school all day, five days a
week, takes its toll. One parent said, “By the time school is over they don’t want
to come back and do church.” Another parent said, “They don’t want to come to
church and just do the same things they are doing at school.” In the current
model of ministry, middle school youths could be on the church/ school campus
from 7am to 7pm if they participate in the Wednesday evening programs.
Communication and Organization
One challenge monopolized the focus groups: communication! There is a deep feeling of
not knowing what is going on, when it is happening, who is in charge, what expectations
are, etc. This, along with a feel that things are generally unorganized, seemed to be the
biggest point of frustration of parents. Comments included:
• “Often times the information seems vague and non-committal.”
• “When people feel like they are going to be left hanging they are not going to do
it.”
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
MINISTRY ARCHITECTS EXISTS TO:
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BUILD the competence, joy, and longevity of ministry professionals
CONSTRUCT bridges to the best ministry resources available today
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• “If I’m going to give my time, I want my time to be organized.”
• “We need details of the event: who/where/when/etc. to feel safe about bringing
our kids to something.”
• “It is a church wide issue but is magnified in the youth program.”
It seems that this particular challenge plays a large role in many of the other challenges
St. Mark’s faces.
Lack of Consistency
Parents stated that they were increasingly frustrated with the feeling that they could not
anticipate when regular youth events where happening. One parent explained, “I am
never sure if I should drop my child off for something or not. It could have been canceled
and we may not know about it.” St. Mark’s has not created an environment where the
youth and families feel comfortable in the consistency in the programs and the events
that are being offered.
Leader Training and Development
There is a feeling that very little (if any) training is being giving to those who are
volunteering to work with the youth, and a feeling among parents and others that staff
does not have a good sense on how to manage volunteers. One Sunday school teacher
stated that she felt like she needed to be “better trained to feel confident in what I am
doing as a teacher.” A parent suggested, “Those who are overseeing volunteers need to
be better trained in directing them.”
A Place for the Youth
While the renovations are happening at St. Mark’s School the church has been asked to
share space among programs to free up room for the school. As a result the youth have
lost their permanent gathering place. Brooks’ office tends to be a place where some of
the youth will gather but it is full of supplies and has a capacity issue. If the group
wanted to gather in any large number they would have no place to do it. Although this is
a temporary problem, and should be resolved when the construction is completed, it is
still a challenge that needs to be navigated thoughtfully and strategically.
Future Staffing Anxiety
There are many questions around what the youth staffing will look like after Brooks
leaves. Questions ranged from “Will the new person be clergy?” to “Will he or she be full
time or part time?” It was clear from many parents and other interested parties that they
feel it is important to hire someone who has a solid knowledge of the emotional, spiritual,
behavioral, and intellectual needs of adolescents and that they have a solid theological
foundation. There is a fear among some of the middle school/ high school boys that the
program will change radically with a new person, although many of them also agree that
some change is needed. Finally, there is an understanding from both parents and
supporters that the expectations placed on Brooks over the past six years have been
unattainable and unrealistic; they do not want to see this happen to the next person.
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
MINISTRY ARCHITECTS EXISTS TO:
DESIGN sustainable, deep-impact ministries, one church at a time
BUILD the competence, joy, and longevity of ministry professionals
CONSTRUCT bridges to the best ministry resources available today
Page 9 of 26
Defining Success for the Youth Program
When asked “What would a successful youth program look like at St. Mark’s?” the focus
groups struggled to come to a consensus. Here are a few of the responses we heard:
• “Quality is more than quantity. If you build a vibrant program quantity will come.”
• “Count all the kids who are involved in anything (choir, acolytes, etc.). They do
not all have to be in one place at one time.”
• “When the church is excited about what it is offering youth the youth will
respond.”
• “To have a variety of events. Not just things that appeal to one group of youth.”
• “Help the youth understand that they are working for something greater.”
• “Kids want to be here, and have friends who want to be here.”
• “Getting together in an intergenerational way.”
• “We create a safe place free from peer pressure where the youth can come
together and just be.”
With a lack of clarity on what success looks like the anxiety surrounding the program will
likely remain no matter who is in leadership.
Scheduling Conflicts
Sport, school activities, and long days seem to be the greatest conflicts in scheduling
youth events and programs -- especially during the week. Resolving this conflict is
exacerbated by limited space at the church. Internal and external scheduling conflicts
have added to feeling that not all are welcome at the program and that the youth ministry
is not a church wide effort or priority.
Demographic Struggles
Most all of the youth ministry events and programs at St. Mark’s are for all youth 6th-12th
grade including trips, bible studies, and outings. As one parent stated, “Twelth graders
don’t want to be with eighth graders.” There are few events that are only for middle
school or only for high school even when the potential size of those two groups would
dictate the need for separate events. There is also a growing divide between the girls
and the boys engaged in the ministry, especially in middle school. A girl’s only bible
study seems to be creating an environment of us versus them.
Lack of Curriculum
There is no set curriculum for EYC or any of the youth ministry programs. A set
curriculum for the program offers direction, expectation, and understanding not just for
the youth in the program but for parents, volunteers and other supporters. Without a
curriculum calendar the program has taken on a “cruise director” mentality and has failed
to engage youth in a most faithful and meaningful way. One parent identified another
cost: “If we understood what the program was trying to achieve we would be willing to
support it more.” Addressing this challenge will help in addressing the challenges of
depth, communication/organization, and consistency.
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
MINISTRY ARCHITECTS EXISTS TO:
DESIGN sustainable, deep-impact ministries, one church at a time
BUILD the competence, joy, and longevity of ministry professionals
CONSTRUCT bridges to the best ministry resources available today
Page 10 of 26
RECOMMENDATIONS
1) Reframe the next 18 months as a time of goal setting and infrastructure building for
the youth ministry. Target December 2017 as the date for achieving sustainable
structures for the youth ministry knowing that incremental successes will be seen
throughout the renovation.
2) Establish a Prayer Team to undergird this renovation process.
3) Present this report to the Vestry requesting that they endorse an 18-month strategic
design process for the youth ministry.
4) Establish a Youth Ministry Renovation Team, made up of four to five volunteers who
report regularly to the Dean. These non-anxious, goal-oriented people will free up the
staff to focus on exceptional day-to-day ministry, while the Renovation Team focuses
on the recommendations below. These recommendations include two overarching
responsibilities:
I. Work with the Dean to address the immediate pressure points facing the
ministry as they transition toward sustainability.
II. Establish a consensus for the direction of the ministry and take
responsibility for implementing the strategic, long-term changes
recommended in this report.
5) Engage the services of Ministry Architects to take responsibility for:
• Working with the staff and volunteers to ensure the achievement of the
outcomes outlined in this report’s timeline,
• Assisting the youth ministry in overcoming the obstacles that are certain
to arise in the process of restructuring and fine-tuning the youth ministry.
• Assisting the Renovation Team and Search Committee with the search
process to fill the youth director position.
RENOVATION TEAM TASK #1: Address the Pressure Points
(Accomplish these urgent tasks first to create a healthy climate conducive to change.)
Pressure Point #1: Organization and Communication – Spend significant time
creating a cohesive plan of organizing the youth ministry and building a simple, clear
communication strategy.
o Finish the Youth Ministry Manual
o Build a new program plan (see Pressure Point #2)
o Determine the best ways to communicate with parents, youth, volunteers and
the church at large
o Complete and publish a 12-month calendar
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
MINISTRY ARCHITECTS EXISTS TO:
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CONSTRUCT bridges to the best ministry resources available today
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o Create major event notebooks to help event planners succeed
o Generate a preventative maintenance calendar that schedules behind-thescenes
activities for each month (like “August: nail down the date for next
year’s ski trip”)
o Establish normative processes for effective and timely communication with
parents, youth, and leaders utilizing as many forms of communication as
possible including updating the youth page of the church’s website,
Facebook, mass texting, mail, e-mail, etc.
Pressure Point #2: Build (and follow) a Consistent Calendar – Determine what
programs and events will be a part of the youth ministry calendar for the rest of 2016.
o Consider shifting the weekly meeting from Wednesday to Sunday night
o Put together a teaching calendar with topics to cover for the remainder of the
year
o Incorporate regular opportunities for local missions and community service
o Consider discontinuing Sunday school for middle and high school students
and help them be a part of the larger church community on Sunday mornings
Pressure Point #3: Develop a Sustainable Staffing Model and Build the Team –
Keeping the Ministry Architects “architect,” general contractor,” and “laborer” analogy in
mind, develop an appropriate long-term staffing model including the professional and
volunteer components for the youth ministry that will provide the church with significant
capacity to sustain a thriving ministry to its targeted number of youth. Within this staffing
model, determine which role is the best for a new staff member and develop paid and
volunteer roles around that person. Recruit enough volunteers to ensure that all bases
are covered for the next six months as well as begin the process of filling the open youth
ministry position.
Short Term:
o Make a list of immediate volunteer positions that need to be filled
o Using the church directory create a list of potential volunteers
o Divide up this list of potential volunteers and begin calling them personally
o Go back to step one until all positions have been filled
Long Term:
o Put together a search committee to begin the process of hiring the next staff
member to work with youth
o Build a new staffing structure to address all of the needs of the ministry (both
relational and administrative)
o Write a clear job description for this position including gifts and skills needed as
well as specific job requirements
o Begin the search by networking and/or contract with Ministry Architects to help
with the search
o Fill other staff positions that have been determined
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
MINISTRY ARCHITECTS EXISTS TO:
DESIGN sustainable, deep-impact ministries, one church at a time
BUILD the competence, joy, and longevity of ministry professionals
CONSTRUCT bridges to the best ministry resources available today
Page 12 of 26
Pressure Point #4: Engage Parents in Ministry – Create a plan to engage parents of
youth in the ministry in a deeper way. This plan can include recruiting parents for key
volunteer roles as well as offering specific parenting classes or seminars. Some ideas
are:
o Hold a seminar on helping kids navigate social media
o Build support groups for families with similar needs (blended families, single
parents, parents with newborns, etc.)
o Pair parents with “parenting mentors” who can offer solid, Biblical parenting
advice
Pressure Point #5: Give the Teens Their Space – Designate a room for teens to use
during EYC programs. This can be shared space but should have a distinctive youth
“feel” during programs and events.
RENOVATION TEAM TASK #2: Establishing a consensus for the direction
of the youth ministry and the creation of its infrastructure, including the
completion of the following tasks:
BUILDING INFRASTRUCTURE AND STABILITY
o Host a “Quick Start” Retreat: Invite the Renovation Team, key volunteers, and
youth staff to participate in a Quick Start Retreat in which the renovation process
is launched and the pressure points outlined in the Assessment Report
are addressed. The retreat tackles the items that need to be done first, and
builds momentum for the youth ministry renovation process.
o Visioning: Invite parents and leaders to participate in a multi-session, oncampus
process of visioning a new future for the youth ministry with Ministry
Architects, resulting in the following documents which will direct the ministry:
o A ministry mission statement
o A statement of values
o A set of three-year revolving goals and one-year benchmarks
o An organizational structure for the ministry
o Christian Formation: Gather a team for a Christian Formation Retreat to
discuss the learning objectives of each age level and how these might be
accomplished utilizing available curriculum.
Develop a long-range scope and sequence as well as a set of core
competencies for the youth ministry programming.
Develop a clear plan for milestones and special events to shape the faith
formation through the ages and stages.
Assess the contribution and limitation of Christian studies as integrated by
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
MINISTRY ARCHITECTS EXISTS TO:
DESIGN sustainable, deep-impact ministries, one church at a time
BUILD the competence, joy, and longevity of ministry professionals
CONSTRUCT bridges to the best ministry resources available today
Page 13 of 26
the school.
Evaluate current curriculum used in the programmatic ministries youth
ministry to ensure its effectiveness and identify voids and/or
shortcomings.
Determine how the curriculum selected will be communicated to
volunteers.
Decide what level of training will be required prior to full implementation.
o Attendance: Track attendance for all youth activities and develop an attendance
system that allows for easy access to weekly participation numbers.
o Marketing: Establish clear internal marketing processes that allow parents,
youth, leaders, and the broader church to be exposed to the successes and good
news surrounding the youth ministry.
o Youth Ministry Manual: Develop a Youth Ministry Manual, including the most
recent youth directory, a 12-18-Month calendar, results-based job descriptions
for staff and volunteers, compliance documents, budgets, game plans, a
preventative maintenance calendar, and notes for every major youth ministry
event.
o Fall Kick-Off/Parent Orientation: Develop an intentional, family-based,
incredibly fun Fall Kickoff event to launch the youth ministry in the fall of 2016.
Use that event to cast the vision, share information, and build enthusiasm about
the year ahead.
o Enlist an Experienced, Professional Coach: Invite Ministry Architects to play
the “coach” role during this renovation period. Ministry Architects would offer
experienced direction for the building of an infrastructure for the youth ministry
and provide ongoing coaching for the youth ministry staff members as well as the
Renovation Teams.
DEVELOPING AND NURTURING STAFF AND SERVANTS
o Staff Development: Provide mechanisms for on-going education and coaching
for the youth ministry staff including coaching, reading and seminars.
o Sustainable Pace: Help each youth ministry staff member develop a “rhythmic
week” including a Sabbath and “balcony” time (that is, time to look at the big
picture and make strategic plans).
o Leadership Development: Complete results-based, written job descriptions for
all paid and volunteer positions in the youth ministry and create a structure for
the ongoing training of all volunteers at least quarterly.
o Volunteer Recruitment: Build a fortified volunteer leadership team, some of who
will do relational ministry with youth while others work behind the scenes. Create
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
MINISTRY ARCHITECTS EXISTS TO:
DESIGN sustainable, deep-impact ministries, one church at a time
BUILD the competence, joy, and longevity of ministry professionals
CONSTRUCT bridges to the best ministry resources available today
Page 14 of 26
a clear and complete list of the volunteer needs. Create a “fishing pond” list of at
least 40 possible volunteers to call on for weekly volunteer positions.
o Broaden Volunteer Definition and Opportunities: Create additional, nonthreatening
opportunities for adult involvement in the program. Encourage
volunteer involvement in both visible and behind-the-scenes opportunities.
o Leadership Launch: Schedule and implement an inspiring leadership-training
event for all volunteer youth workers at the beginning of each school year.
DEVELOPING CLEAR STRATEGIES AND NEW INITIATIVES
o Parent Engagement: Create a written process for engaging the majority of
parents in the ministry in some way during the 2016-2017 school year. Possibly
sponsor and execute an encouraging parent support event and create
mechanisms for engaging the majority of parents in the youth ministry in some
way.
o Measurable Markers of Effectiveness: Determine reasonable participation
goals for all youth ministry events and weekly programs through August 2017
and take responsibility for filling those events.
o Missions and Outreach: Continue to build on the desire of youth and parents to
make a difference in the world, as well as their local community. Develop a clear,
focused calendar for involvement in local agencies, as well as, regional, and
possibly international missions. Create a plan for promoting and exposing the
congregation to missions throughout the year.
o Youth Contact: Develop and implement processes for ensuring that each youth
or youth parent in the church receives a contact from someone on the youth
leadership team at least once a month.
o Family Ministry: Plan one or two family events throughout the year focused on
building family relationships and fun fellowship.
o Fortify the Bridge: Gather youth ministry leaders and teachers at the school
who are members of St. Mark’s to develop a plan that works on creative ways to
better build bridges between school families and the ministries of St. Mark’s.
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
MINISTRY ARCHITECTS EXISTS TO:
DESIGN sustainable, deep-impact ministries, one church at a time
BUILD the competence, joy, and longevity of ministry professionals
CONSTRUCT bridges to the best ministry resources available today
Page 15 of 26
PROPOSED TIMELINE AND OPTIONAL CONSULTING PROPOSAL
PROPOSED TIMELINE – JULY 2016 – NOVEMBER 2017
The following provides Saint Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral with a timeline that can serve
as a blueprint for the strategic launch of sustainable, long-term youth ministry.
Many churches choose to use the services of Ministry Architects to provide coaching
and experienced troubleshooting through this infrastructure-building process. If the
church would like Ministry Architects to provide more specialized consulting in certain
areas, particularly for the 18-month transition, we are available to help.
July 2016
Focus: Starting Right and Work Begins
Outcomes:
• This report has been presented to the Vestry for the strategic renovation of
the youth ministry and the Vestry has given full support of this plan.
• A Quick Start Retreat has been scheduled for August.
• A Leadership Launch has been scheduled for early September for the
volunteers in the youth ministry.
• The Renovation Team for youth has been recruited and the first meeting has
been scheduled to take place during the Quick Start Retreat.
• A prayer team has been recruited and charged with praying for the youth
ministry. They have received a copy of the assessment report and timeline.
• Any immediate volunteer needs for the youth ministry have been determined
and slots have been filled.
• Results-based job descriptions have been written and distributed to the
appropriate volunteers for the youth ministry.
• Work has begun on the 2016-2017 youth ministry calendar including deciding
on Sunday school and EYC.
• Ministry Architects has been hired to serve as the architect for the entire
renovation process.
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
MINISTRY ARCHITECTS EXISTS TO:
DESIGN sustainable, deep-impact ministries, one church at a time
BUILD the competence, joy, and longevity of ministry professionals
CONSTRUCT bridges to the best ministry resources available today
Page 16 of 26
August 2016
Focus: Renovation Underway, Calendars, Volunteers, Database, Volunteer Thank
You, Quick Start Retreat
Outcomes:
• A fishing pond of 40 potential volunteers in the youth ministry has been
created.
• Work on the youth database has begun, collecting the most recent
information for families and youth. All are categorized in a manner that will
follow up on MIA families and youth. Each youth has been classified in the
following categories:
Active Youth are the ones whose families are members and have
attended at least once in the past year – plus visitors who have become a
regular part of the group. They should show up in your printed youth
ministry directory.
Member Inactive (MIA) are still a part of the flock. You may not need to
send them a message every time the group gets together, but you’ll want
to regularly pursue these youth, whether they ever show up or not.
Visitor Active are those who regularly attend weekly programs and/or
activities but are not an official member of the church.
Visitor Inactive are the ones who may have visited, but you are confident
they will never become a regular part of the group. This group requires no
follow up. But you’ll want to keep their information for the occasional big
event to which you’ll want to invite everyone you know.
First Timers refer to visitors who have attended a program for the first
time. You’ll want to have a process for capturing their information on their
first visit and follow up with them within one week of their visit.
• A Visioning Summit has been scheduled for October and a “save the date”
email/postcard has been sent to all families.
• A Quick Start Retreat has taken place in which the renovation process was
launched and pressure points outlined in the Assessment Report have been
addressed. The retreat tackled the items that needed to be done first to
initiate the youth ministry renovation process.
• A Fall Kick-off for the youth ministry has been scheduled for early September.
A team of parents has been recruited to implement the Fall Kick-off.
• The 2016-2017 youth ministry calendar has been completed.
• Curriculum has been chosen for the upcoming school year.
• Discussions about a designated youth space have been completed and
decisions have been made.
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
MINISTRY ARCHITECTS EXISTS TO:
DESIGN sustainable, deep-impact ministries, one church at a time
BUILD the competence, joy, and longevity of ministry professionals
CONSTRUCT bridges to the best ministry resources available today
Page 17 of 26
September 2016
Focus: Calendars, Database, Communications, Visioning Promotion, Leadership
Launch, Curriculum
Outcomes:
• The 2016-2017 youth ministry calendar has been distributed to all youth and
their families. The calendar has been publicized and major event dates are
on the church’s calendar.
• A Fall Kick-off has taken place that welcomed youth and parents into a
program they can get excited about, introduced parents to a format and
structure they can feel confident about and provided a forum for receiving
information from families. All participants felt energized and enthusiastic
about the coming year’s programs.
• Promotion of the Visioning Summit has begun.
• A database of all youth and their families has been compiled and each
person is “tagged” with a category
• Communication norms have been determined and those best practices are
being implemented.
• All volunteers have experienced a Leadership Launch, lasting 2-4 hours that
clarified their roles, inspired them to grow in their own faith and equipped
them to serve.
• Reasonable participation goals have been established for all youth ministry
events and weekly programs through December 2016 and clear lines of
responsibility for filling those events have been established.
• Mechanisms for on-going education and coaching for the youth ministry staff
and key volunteers have been provided.
October 2016
Focus: Visioning Summit, Pressure Points, Calendar, Curriculum, Fall Kick-off
Outcomes:
• All pressure points have been addressed.
• One-year benchmarks have been assigned to each three-year, revolving goal
developed in the visioning process.
• A Christian Formation Summit has been scheduled for early 2017. The
retreat will facilitate a discussion of the learning objectives of each age level
and how these might be accomplished utilizing available curriculum.
• Curriculum has been distributed to all teachers/volunteers and they are
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
MINISTRY ARCHITECTS EXISTS TO:
DESIGN sustainable, deep-impact ministries, one church at a time
BUILD the competence, joy, and longevity of ministry professionals
CONSTRUCT bridges to the best ministry resources available today
Page 18 of 26
trained to implement the curriculum.
• Work has begun on major event notebooks – creating a template for the
notebooks and collecting information on each youth event.
• A process for tracking and recording attendance in all youth ministry
programs has been created and implemented.
• A meeting of youth ministry leaders and teachers at the school who are
members of St. Mark’s to has occurred to develop a plan that works on
creative ways to better build bridges between school families and the
ministries of St. Mark’s.
• Work has begun on the summer calendar for 2017.
November 2016
Focus: Participation Goals, Volunteers, Budget, Compliance
Outcomes:
• A Visioning Summit with all major stakeholders has occurred producing
visioning documents for the youth ministry (mission statement, core values,
goals and structure).
• Reasonable participation goals have been determined for all youth ministry
events and weekly programs through August 2017 and steps to accomplish
those targets have begun to be implemented.
• All volunteer needs for the 2016-2017 school year for the youth ministry have
been filled.
• A volunteer application, an application process and a screening process for
all weekly hands-on volunteers have been created and implemented
• Background checks (or other screening methods) have been done for all
weekly hands-on volunteers.
• All paperwork for hands on, weekly volunteers has been updated.
• A detailed 2017 budget for the youth ministry has been completed and
submitted to the appropriate group.
• A game plan for the staff and volunteers to foster a relational atmosphere and
build incarnational relationships with youth for deep and long-lasting impact in
the ministry has been implemented.
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
MINISTRY ARCHITECTS EXISTS TO:
DESIGN sustainable, deep-impact ministries, one church at a time
BUILD the competence, joy, and longevity of ministry professionals
CONSTRUCT bridges to the best ministry resources available today
Page 19 of 26
December 2016
Focus: Mid-Course Evaluation, Major Event Notebooks, Attendance,
Communication
Outcomes:
• The Renovation Team has completed a 6-month mid-course evaluation of the
renovation process and made any adjustments necessary to improve the
work being done.
• Communication methods currently being used to promote the youth ministry
and share the successes with the congregation have been evaluated and
added to if necessary.
• A process for engaging the majority of parents in the ministry in some way
during the 2015-2016 school year has been written and implemented.
• Continuing education opportunities have been explored and calendared for
the youth ministry staff.
• The Renovation Team has met monthly and decided how often they will meet
for the remainder of the 18 months.
January 2017
Focus: Christian Formation Summit, Calendars, Marketing, Volunteer Training
Outcomes:
• Interested staff, volunteers, and parents have gathered for a Christian
Formation Retreat to discuss the learning objectives of each age level and
how these might be accomplished utilizing available curriculum.
• Clear, internal marketing processes have been established that allow all
church members to be exposed to the successes and good news surrounding
the youth ministry.
• A mid-year training event has taken place in which all volunteers received
support and training in their specific roles. A “check-in” with each volunteer
has taken place to evaluate how the volunteer has been doing in their role
and addressed any concerns.
• The summer 2017 calendar for the youth ministry has been completed and
distributed.
• Building on the desire of youth and parents to make a difference in the world
and their community, a clear, well-publicized calendar has been created for
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
MINISTRY ARCHITECTS EXISTS TO:
DESIGN sustainable, deep-impact ministries, one church at a time
BUILD the competence, joy, and longevity of ministry professionals
CONSTRUCT bridges to the best ministry resources available today
Page 20 of 26
involvement in local agencies, as well as, regional, and possibly international
missions. Current mission trips have been evaluated for their effectiveness.
February 2017
Focus: Calendar, Volunteer Recruitment
Outcomes:
• The 2017-2018 youth ministry calendar has been completed through August
2018 including a Fall Kick-off.
• Volunteer recruiting seasons has opened.
o Volunteer job descriptions have been reviewed and updated as needed.
o Names of potential volunteers have been added to the fishing pond.
o All volunteer needs have been determined for the 2017-2018 school year.
o The volunteer needs list and the potential volunteers list has been
merged.
o Current volunteers have been asked to evaluate and possibly renew their
commitment to the youth ministry.
o Recruitment has begun for hands-on weekly volunteers, event
coordinators and behind-the-scenes volunteers for 2017-2018.
March 2017
Focus: Database, MIA, Volunteer Thank You
Outcomes:
• A volunteer thank you event has been scheduled for May and promotional
materials have gone out to all youth volunteers.
• MIA youth have been systematically contacted.
• The collection of updated information from each youth and family has been
completed and the database for youth ministry has been updated with that
new information.
• A game plan has been written and implemented for welcoming new families,
youth, and guests to the church so that they feel warmly welcomed. The plan
has included a timely follow up plan to ensure their return to the church.
• A Confirmation plan has been developed with the assistance of the clergy
and input from a key group of parents. The plan included the duration of the
program, what age it is to take place, and what will be taught.
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
MINISTRY ARCHITECTS EXISTS TO:
DESIGN sustainable, deep-impact ministries, one church at a time
BUILD the competence, joy, and longevity of ministry professionals
CONSTRUCT bridges to the best ministry resources available today
Page 21 of 26
April 2017
Focus: Benchmarks, Recruitment, Fall Kick-off, Major Event Notebooks
Outcomes:
• 50% of the one-year benchmarks have been accomplished.
• Volunteer recruitment has continued.
• A Fall Kick-off team has been recruited to begin planning for the start of the
fall youth ministry programs.
• All major event notebooks have been updated by the event coordinators and
given back to the youth staff to pass along to the next year’s coordinator.
• A process has been implemented to ensure that each youth or youth parent
in the church receives a contact from someone on the youth leadership team
at least once a month
• A written game plan for inviting specific, non-parent demographics in the
congregation when recruiting volunteers has been implemented.
May 2017
Focus: Volunteer Thank You, Directory, Curriculum
Outcomes:
• With the most recent information on youth and their families, a directory of all
families and a directory of all volunteers have been created to be distributed
at the Fall Kick-off.
• The effectiveness of this past year’s curriculum has been reviewed and
decisions have been made for any necessary changes for the upcoming
school year.
• A volunteer thank you event has taken place.
• One or two family events have been calendared for the upcoming year. They
have been focused on building family relationships and fun fellowship.
June 2017
Focus: Manual, Volunteers
Outcomes:
• All volunteer needs for the 2017-2018 school year for youth ministry have
been filled.
• The Youth Ministry Manuals (both hard copy and digital) have been
completed, including
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
MINISTRY ARCHITECTS EXISTS TO:
DESIGN sustainable, deep-impact ministries, one church at a time
BUILD the competence, joy, and longevity of ministry professionals
CONSTRUCT bridges to the best ministry resources available today
Page 22 of 26
o Visioning documents
o Directories
o Volunteer directory
o Volunteer training agendas and notes
o Attendance records
o Annual calendar
o Results-based job descriptions
o Game plans and new initiatives
o Meeting agendas and minutes for Renovation Team.
o Christian Formation Plan and record of curriculum resources used for the
current year
o Budget and other financial documents
o Recruiting template, with a record of all the volunteer needs for the year
o Compliance documents
July 2017
Focus: Compliance, Preventative Maintenance Calendar, Reflection and Re-
Assessment
Outcomes:
• A review of the renovation process has been completed.
• An online diagnostic has been completed to re-assess the youth ministry.
• Current pressure points have been named.
• A preventative maintenance calendar has been created for the youth ministry
that will help regularly deal with on-going “behind the scenes” ministry
maintenance.
• New, non-threatening opportunities for adult involvement in the program have
been created. Parent involvement has been encouraged, both visible and
behind-the-scenes.
August 2017
Focus: Major Event Notebooks, Leadership Launch, Participation Goals,
Compliance
Outcomes:
• All paperwork for hands on, weekly volunteers has been updated.
Background checks have been completed on each volunteer.
• All volunteers have experienced a Leadership Launch, lasting 2-4 hours that
clarified their roles, inspired them to grow in their own faith and equipped
them to serve.
• Major event notebooks for each major event for the youth ministry have been
handed out to this year’s event coordinators.
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
MINISTRY ARCHITECTS EXISTS TO:
DESIGN sustainable, deep-impact ministries, one church at a time
BUILD the competence, joy, and longevity of ministry professionals
CONSTRUCT bridges to the best ministry resources available today
Page 23 of 26
• Reasonable participation goals have been determined for all youth ministry
events and weekly programs through August 2018 and steps to accomplish
those targets have begun to be implemented.
September 2017
Focus: Fall Kick-off, Benchmarks, Curriculum
Outcomes:
• All one-year benchmarks have been achieved. Goals have been re-upped
and new one-year benchmarks have been established.
• Curriculum has been distributed to all teachers/volunteers and they have
been trained to implement the curriculum.
• A Fall Kick-off has taken place that welcomed youth and parents into a
program they can get excited about, introduced parents to a format and
structure they can feel confident about and provided a forum for receiving
information from families. All participants feel energized and enthusiastic
about the coming year’s programs.
October 2017
Focus: Strategic Staffing, Budget
Outcomes:
• A detailed 2018 budget for the youth ministry has been completed and
submitted to the appropriate group.
• With the changes in the youth ministry, the volunteer staffing to meet the size
and scope of the youth ministry has been evaluated and a game plan to meet
those needs has been created if necessary.
November 2017
Focus: Sustainability
Outcomes:
• A timeline for the next 12 months has been created that included game plans
for the current pressure points and items from the online diagnostic.
• Game plans have been put in place to sustain the processes and procedures
during the renovation
• Ongoing coaching has been secured and a sustainability plan has been put in
place.
• The staff and Renovation Team have celebrated what God has done with
their 18-month investment.
• The Renovation Team has transitioned their role to providing support and
accountability to the youth volunteers and focusing on strategic issues such
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
MINISTRY ARCHITECTS EXISTS TO:
DESIGN sustainable, deep-impact ministries, one church at a time
BUILD the competence, joy, and longevity of ministry professionals
CONSTRUCT bridges to the best ministry resources available today
Page 24 of 26
as three-year goals and one-year benchmarks, curriculum selection,
calendars, and volunteer recruitment.
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
MINISTRY ARCHITECTS EXISTS TO:
DESIGN sustainable, deep-impact ministries, one church at a time
BUILD the competence, joy, and longevity of ministry professionals
CONSTRUCT bridges to the best ministry resources available today
Page 25 of 26
The Ministry Architects Team Serving
St. Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral in Shreveport, LA
Chris Sasser - Lead Consultant
chris.sasser@ministryarchitects.com
919-612-7410
Chris is the Director of Family Ministries at Port City Community Church in Wilmington, NC. He has a
passion for helping connect students to God, to leaders and to each other. He has worked in fulltime
ministry since 1993, working with Children’s, Middle School, High School and College Ministries.
He also has a heart to help the church truly partner with parents and help parents realize their
potential as the primary spiritual leaders for their children.
Chris is married to Karin and they have two children, CJ and Kylie. Chris is a graduate of UNCChapel
Hill and is an avid sports (and Tarheel) fan.
Brian Kuhn - Staff Consultant
Rob.dyer@ministryarchitects.com
618-315-2788
Brian Kuhn is the Director of Youth & Family Ministries at Webster Groves Presbyterian Church in St.
Louis, MO. He has been involved in youth ministry since 1999 and been in a paid position at
Webster Groves Pres. since 2000. His positions at Webster Groves Pres. have taken many forms over
the years but the one constant has been his passion and dedication to the youth and families of
the congregation and the community. Church, adolescents, and faithfulness are his passions in
life and he works hard to constantly bring all of those elements together no matter what he is
doing. He frequently teaches workshops, and speaks to groups about topics like the adolescent
brain, sex and sexuality, and building a youth ministry and congregation that is not afraid to
address and embrace the challenges of adolescents, parenting and being community.
Brian has a Master of Arts in Profession Counseling and is a Licensed Profession Counselor in the
State of Missouri. The combination of his ministry and clinical work has given him a unique view of
today’s adolescent, the challenges they face, and how the church can and should be a
sanctuary for youth and their families. Brian lives with his wife Jennifer and their two children Chase
and Paige. Playing in the yard with his kids, traveling with his wife, and running alone are some of
his major passions outside of work. Brian and his family are avid St. Louis sports fans with the
Cardinals and the Blues on top of their list of teams to be excited about (and lose sleep over)!
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
MINISTRY ARCHITECTS EXISTS TO:
DESIGN sustainable, deep-impact ministries, one church at a time
BUILD the competence, joy, and longevity of ministry professionals
CONSTRUCT bridges to the best ministry resources available today
Page 26 of 26
Missy Carfield – Senior Consultant
missy.carfield@ymarchitects.com
Missy Carfield was raised in Indiana but called Kentucky and Michigan home before
enthusiastically responding to God’s prompt to move to Florida in 2002. Though a graduate of Ball
State University (’92) and Asbury Theological Seminary (’97), she still has those dreams about
heading to a final for the course she forgot to attend all semester.
Missy has been pouring into the lives of young people and their families through the local church
since 1994. While an experienced speaker at camps and conferences, including NYWC (National
Youth Workers Convention), her deepest passion is satisfied seeing youth, volunteers and families
connected to Christ, the church and the world.
Enjoying football, cooking, reading, traveling, and anything with a story, Missy lives in Venice, FL
with her husband Jim, their two children: Gavin, Finley and the family canine, Colby Jack.